Ripping and Piracy

Piracy is definitely not confined to ripping and ripping does not always involve piracy. It is 2015 and any audio a person needs is available online.

Nowadays, people hardly buy music. They refer to websites for a download and make all the changes they want.

Piracy is definitely not confined to ripping and ripping does not always involve piracy. It is 2015 and any audio a person needs is available online. Nowadays, people hardly buy music. They refer to websites for a download and have folders full of downloaded mp3s. The day we’ll no longer have audio CDs is not a decade away. There was a time we felt cassettes were the ultimate thing after records. By 2025, ripping would be probably a part in the history books.

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Personal copying acknowledgments

According to Congressional reports, part of the Audio Home Recording Act (AHRA) of 1992 was intended to resolve the debate over home taping. However, 17 USC 1008, the relevant text of the legislation, didn’t fully indemnify consumers for noncommercial, private copying. Such copying is broadly permitted using analog devices and media, but digital copying is only permitted with certain technology like DAT, MiniDisc, and “audio” CD-R—not with computer hard drives, portable media players, and general-purpose CD-Rs.

The AHRA was partially tested in RIAA v. Diamond Multimedia, Inc., a late-1990s case which broached the subject of a consumer’s right to copy and format-shift, but which ultimately only ascertained that one of the first portable MP3 players wasn’t even a “digital recording device” covered by the law, so its maker wasn’t required to pay royalties to the recording industry under other terms of the AHRA.

Statements made by the court in that case, and by both the House and Senate in committee reports about the AHRA, do interpret the legislation as being intended to permit private, noncommercial copying with any digital technology. However, these interpretations may not be binding.

How legal is it?

When the material being ripped is not in the public domain, and the person making the rip does not have the copyright owner’s permission, it may be regarded as copyright infringement. However, some countries either explicitly allow it in certain circumstances, or at least don’t forbid it. Some countries also have fair use-type laws which allow unauthorized copies to be made under certain conditions. As mentioned above, circumventing copy protection mechanisms, such as the encryption used on most commercial DVDs, may also be illegal in many countries.

Recording industry representatives have made conflicting statements about ripping.

Executives claimed that ripping may be regarded as copyright infringement. In oral arguments before the Supreme Court in MGM Studios, Inc. v. Grokster, Ltd., MGM attorney Don Verrilli (later appointed United States Solicitor General by the Obama administration), stated: “The record companies, my clients, have said, for some time now, and it’s been on their Website for some time now, that it’s perfectly lawful to take a CD that you’ve purchased, upload it onto your computer, put it onto your iPod. There is a very, very significant lawful commercial use for that device, going forward.”

Ripping Software

A CD ripper, CD grabber or CD extractor is a software designed to extract or “rip” raw digital audio (in a format commonly called CDDA) from a CD to the system with a compatible extension. Some all-in-one ripping programs can simplify the entire process by ripping and burning the audio to disc in one step, possibly re-encoding the audio on-the-fly in the process. The ripping software tells the CD drive’s firmware to read this data and parse out just the audio encoded samples. The software then dumps them into a WAV or AIFF file, or feeds them to another codec to produce. Depending on the capabilities of the ripping software, ripping may be done on a track-by-track basis, or all tracks at once, or over a custom range. The ripping software may also have facilities for detecting and correcting errors during or after the rip, as the process is not always reliable, especially when the CD is damaged or defective.

There are also DVD rippers which operate in a similar fashion. Unlike CDs, DVDs do contain data formatted in files for use in computers. However, commercial DVDs are often encrypted preventing access to the files without using the ripping software’s decryption ability, which may not be legal to distribute or use. DVD files are often larger than is convenient to distribute or copy to CD-R or ordinary (not dual-layer) DVD-R, so DVD ripping software usually offers the ability to re-encode the content, with some quality loss, so that it fits in smaller files.

Ripping

It is 2015 and if one is socially active on the internet, the first thing that one would drive home on hearing the word “RIP” would be rest in peace. But let’s check the dictionary. It says that the non abbreviated “rip” refers to tearing something apart. Well, in the music industry, it has a different meaning altogether.

Ripping is the process of copying audio or video content to a hard disk, typically from removable media such as an audio CD or a DVD or even flash drives. It is pretty obvious that with the technology we have now, neither the device nor the data is damaged after extraction. Ripping is often used to alter formats, and to edit, duplicate or back up media content. “Digital Audio Extraction (DAE)” happens to be a more formal phrase applied to the ripping of audio CDs. A rip is what we call the copied content, after it is converted to its destination format, along with accompanying files (such as a cue sheet or a log file from the ripping software).

Ripping is very different from simple file copying.

The source audio or video often isn’t originally in an extension which can be played on a media player. Ripping such data usually involves reformatting it and optionally compressing it during the extraction process. Sometimes, the source files are in analog vinyl records and the process starts from a very basic level.